Tagged: Shawn Camp

Cubs Bullpen Can Be Fixed…Without Looking Outside The Organization

Michael Bowden, Alex Burnett, Shawn Camp, Rafael Dolis, Kyuji Fujikawa, Kevin Gregg, Matt Guerrier, Kameron Loe, Carlos Marmol, Blake Parker, Zach Putnam, Brooks Raley, Henry Rodriguez, Hector Rondon, James Russell, Eduardo Sanchez, Pedro Strop, Hisanori Takahashi, and Carlos Villanueva.

That is the list of everybody who’s appeared in a game for the Cubs out of the bullpen thus far.  And that pen has been much maligned.  For a lot of reasons.  The 24 blown saves advance that perception, even though many of those “saves” were blown in the 7th and 8th innings, and not the 9th.  In all actuality, the 9th inning hasn’t gone all that bad for the Cubs.  When the Cubs get to the 9th inning with a lead, they are 45-4.  For comparison sake, they are 1-58 when they enter the 9th trailing.  And overall, the bullpen has been much better of late.  Since the additions of Strop, Guerrier, and Parker, the pen has been solid, and it has not regressed since Guerrier was lost.  With Russell, Parker, and Strop, the Cubs finally have a bridge to Kevin Gregg in the 9th, who has gotten the job done in spite of how interesting it may be.

Looking forward, the Cubs figure to have James Russell, Blake Parker, Pedro Strop, and Carlos Villanueva back in the bullpen next season.  Villanueva may be in the rotation for periods, but it seems like he is best suited to be in the pen, and fill in as a spot starter.  That leaves three openings for next season’s bullpen.  Matt Guerrier may be invited back after rehabbing from forearm surgery.  The Cubs also have some players who can fit nicely into relief roles in the system already.  Brian Schlitter has been dominant at AAA Iowa this season, racking up 17 saves without blowing one.  And Arodys Vizcaino should be back from his elbow issues the last couple of years.  The plan is, tentatively, to send him to play in fall and/ or winter leagues, to get him back on the mound, which would serve him well in rehabbing this off-season.  And he may end up as a starter at some point, but a cautious approach with him, and letting him get innings in a bullpen role would be a way to bring him back at the major league level without running up 150-175 innings in his first year back.  Filling the last slot with Hector Rondon, who has a good arm and a year of experience could make the Cubs pen much better, assuming everyone stays healthy and pitches similarly to how they are now.

Projected 2014 Opening Day Bullpen (assuming no outside moves are made):

Hector Rondon
Brian Schlitter
Carlos Villanueva
Arodys Vizcaino
James Russell
Blake Parker
Pedro Strop

While this exercise is highly speculative, the point is simple: the Cubs have the arms to improve the bullpen within the organization.  And every one of the players in my projection has been in the major leagues, including Schlitter, who appeared in seven games all the way back in 2010.  They have some depth, too.  If the Cubs can figure out what is wrong with Henry Rodriguez and get him to throw strikes, he’s a viable option.  Matt Guerrier has already expressed interest in returning on a minor league deal, and at this point, there is no harm in that.  Eduardo Sanchez was a once promising reliever with the Cardinals, and is young enough to recapture his form.  Kyuji Fujikawa will return at some point next season from Tommy John Surgery.  And most importantly, maybe, Carlos Marmol, who couldn’t finish games at the end of his Cubs’ career, and Shawn Camp, who got beat up a lot this season will not be returning.

The pen is already better right now than it was for most of the summer.  And there is talent in the organization to improve it further next season.  With any offense at all, the Cubs might actually flirt with a winning season, which would be a positive step in the rebuilding effort.

 

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As Deadline Passes, Cubs’ Priority Should Be Extending Dale Sveum

In just about two days time, the non-waiver trade deadline will come and go.  The Cubs, who have been more active than any team in the month of July, will see a considerable slow down in activity with the passing of the draft, the initial international free agent signing period, and the trade deadline.  That leaves them with an ample opportunity to take care of what may be the most vital piece of business they have left before next season: Extend the contract of Manager, Dale Sveum.

Photo: Brian Cassella / Chicago Tribune

Photo: Brian Cassella / Chicago Tribune

As Theo Epstein’s hand picked successor to Mike Quade, Dale Sveum has done everything the Cubs could have imagined…and more.  He deserves to go into next season with some job security, and the Cubs should go into this off-season, where they will surely try to add players who can help the major league team take the next step toward respectability, with stability in the manager’s office.

Although his 109-156 record isn’t outstanding, it is also not his fault.  He walked into a complete overhaul of a roster of albatross contracts, aging veterans, and young players who really weren’t major league players.  To make matters worse, the front office either traded or shut down major portions of his starting rotation…in both 2012 and 2013.  The bullpens he’s had to work with have been largely unproven young players or veteran retreads (*cough cough* Shawn Camp *cough*), and it has shown in the win-loss column.

Dale Sveum was hired to do two main things: Keep the clubhouse together and develop young talent.  He’s done exceedingly well on both fronts in his first two seasons.

On the player development front, the biggest feather in his cap is the coaching staff he’s put together.  While he may have had Rudy Jaramillo and Pat Listach as hold overs for either part or all of last season, the additions of Dave McKay, David Bell, and Chris Bosio have all been successful.  Dave McKay helped turn Alfonso Soriano into a serviceable left fielder.  After years of being afraid of the wall and hopping around like a wounded bunny rabbit, Soriano had the highest UZR among NL left fielders last season.  It’s amazing what a little coaching will do after Soriano admitted that he hadn’t gotten any outfield instruction before last season, from either Quade’s staff or Lou Piniella before him.  Anthony Rizzo is another success, as Sveum, the former Brewers hitting coach, brought his hands down, shortening his swing, and making him better than the .141/.281.242 hitter he was with the Padres in 2011.  The anecdotes serve as evidence of a whole: the Cubs are a vastly improved defensive team from the years before Sveum.  And the approach at the plate is starting to get better, too.  Nothing happens over night, but the results are starting to show up.  In spite of all of the player movement, trades, and lost veterans in the clubhouse, the Cubs have a winning record since May 26 (30-25).  While the sample is small, the results matter.  Even with major bullpen issues and a complete inability to hit with runners in scoring position, the Cubs are playing competitively.  The steps in the right direction are adding up.

The clubhouse is the other place Sveum was asked to thrive.  As a former top prospect, he can relate to the likes of Anthony Rizzo, Starlin Castro, and soon Javier Baez, et al.  He can also relate to the 25th man on the roster because that’s where his career ended after a devastating leg injury.  He knows the weight of expectations and he knows the plight of the role player who is tasked to sit and wait for his name to be called, and the need to be ready.  He relates to his players because he’s been there and done that.  And while he took some undeserved criticism for his loyalty to Shawn Camp from fans, it was not his job to get rid of Camp.  It was the front office’s.  Having his player’s back, especially one who he’s had history with, was the only move he could make that doesn’t send the alienating “as soon as I see trouble, I’m going to turn my back on you.” message.  That’s a terrible image to portray to the rest of the team.  The fact that Dale said it was tough to see Camp go may have made fans cringe, but it probably made the team smile a little bit.  When veterans like Matt Garza hang around after being shut down with 2 1/2 months left in a 100 loss season, it says as much as there is to say about a clubhouse…especially when Garza admitted if it had been Quade’s clubhouse, he would have gone home.  And being able to sign quality free agents like Edwin Jackson after a 100 loss season doesn’t happen if the player thinks the manager is a bum who can’t manage a clubhouse.  Think about it.  Has anything obscenely negative come out of the clubhouse during Sveum’s tenure?  For a team with the win-loss record the Cubs have had, you’d think there would be something.  Especially in a media market like Chicago.  But it’s been remarkably quiet.  Which means the bad stuff is being handled where it should…in house.

Dale has been charged with over-seeing a complete rebuild, which couldn’t have been fun, couldn’t have been easy, and couldn’t have happened in any worse a place than Wrigley Field, where every year is “THE YEAR” to a group of people who only watch the game and read the box score in the paper each morning.  The reality is, last year, this year, and probably next year are not “THE YEAR.”  But the team is heading in the right direction in spite of the instability among the player personnel.  That is a credit to Sveum, and the right thing to do is ensure that he never gets to “lame duck” status in the last year of a contract with a team, who next year may be able to win consistently for the first time in his tenure.

Besides.  He got shot in the face and laughed it off.  How cool is it to have a manager like that?

Cubs Transactions Galore!

There was a flurry of roster activity of all kinds: trades, signings, call-ups, and DL stints.  Theo Epstein and Jed Hoyer didn’t waste any time starting their sell-off, firing the first shot of the deadline season.

We can only gather that there will be even more roster moves in the next day or two with the new additions to the bullpen and over the course of the month as the Cubs continue to move pieces.  This figures to be just a start of things to come…

Dodgers Get: RHP Carlos Marmol, Cubs #4 International Signing Slot, Cash
Cubs Get: RHP Matt Guerrier

What It Means For Cubs:  Carlos Marmol is officially not a Cub, anymore.  Guerrier was in DFA limbo with the Dodgers.  He becomes yet another arm in the Cubs’ busy bullpen this season.  Marmol gets a fresh start.  Adding Guerrier could spell the end for Shawn Camp. *Fingers Crossed*  Jayson Stark, interestingly, tweeted that this is almost a no lose for the Dodgers.  If he doesn’t work out and is released, the Cubs are on the hook for more money if he signs elsewhere.

Orioles Get: RHP Scott Feldman, C Steve Clevenger
Cubs Get: RHP Jake Arrieta, RHP Pedro Strop, Number 3 International Signing Slot, #4 International Signing Slot

What It Means For The Cubs:  Clevenger being moved comes out of right field, since he and the Cubs apparently just within the last day had a difference of opinion on his injuries.  Feldman was expected to go as part of a sell-off, and the Cubs actually did quite well in this move.  Jake Arrieta is a talented 27 year old who hasn’t quite figured it out at the major league level just yet.  He will go to AAA Iowa for the time being.  He could be part of a trade to the Padres, who apparently like both him and Matt Garza.  Acquiring him could help sweeten the return if the Cubs send Garza and Arrieta to San Diego.  Strop is a good bullpen arm and should fill the void being left by Carlos Villanueva being stretched back into a starter.  He, too, has struggled some at the major league level.  Overall, I’d have liked this deal if it was Feldman for Strop OR Arrieta and the pool money.  To get both, while only losing Clevenger in addition to Feldman is a nice move for the Cubs, regardless of whether they view Arreita as a trade asset or as an arm to bring to Chicago.

Astros Get:  INF Ronald Torreyes
Cubs Get:  #2 and #3 International Signing Slots

What It Means For The Cubs:  More international spending money.  Torreyes is a good hitter, but with the logjam in the middle infield in the Cubs’ organization, they could afford to make this move to spend money on potential impact international free agents.  The move brings in $784K to add to the spending pool, which would presumably be used to target OF Eloy Jimenez.  After all of the moves today, the Cubs have $5,520,300 in total international spending money, which is one of the key means of stocking the system with talent.

Cubs Sign: SS Gleybar Torres ($1.7M). P Jefferson Mejia, Erling Moreno, C Johan Matos

What It Means For The Cubs:  The search for impact players continues, with Torres ranked the #2 International Free Agent.  He’s 16, so you can file his name away, but scouts love him and say he is quite polished for being so young.  Mejia is 18 and his contract is for 2013, so he is a name we might hear a bit sooner than Torres.

Cubs Call-Up: LHP Chris Rusin, OF Dave Sappelt

Cubs Place OF Ryan Sweeney on 60 Day Disabled List (Fractured Rib)

What It Means For The Cubs:  Rusin takes the roster spot vacated by Feldman, and he will start tonight at Oakland.  He has been very good at Iowa, being named to the PCL All-Star team.  This is an opportunity to try to stick in Chicago, either in the rotation or the bullpen, as more moves are likely as the deadline approaches.  Sappelt adds a right handed bat to the outfield mix after Sweeney fractured a rib in Seattle.  Sweeney could have been a trade chip, but going on the 60 Day DL kills that opportunity, and is now not eligible to come back until the end of August.

Defending the Decision to Use (and Keep Using) Marmol

It was tough for to watch.  I worked all day, saw none of the game, and got back just in time to turn on the game during the middle of the ninth.  Perfect timing for a classic “Marmol Meltdown.”

The conversation turned heated.  There were tweets of death threats to Marmol, threats of violence towards him.  Which is inexcusable and despicable in every sense of the word.  There is no reason for that kind of nonsense.  Even if it’s Game 7 of the World Series.  If that was you, you should be ashamed.  And have a serious reevaluation of your life’s priorities.

Image

Photo: Kathy Willens, AP

As far as Dale Sveum is concerned, he didn’t have many other options.  Kevin Gregg was not available after pitching four straight days.  Carlos Villanueva was a trendy “WHY THE HELL COULDN’T HE PITCH?!” option.  His ninth inning numbers are horrible, though.  He has a career 5.23 ERA in the ninth, and in save situations, he has an 0-7 record, with a 4.32 ERA and six saves.  None coming since 2010.  That doesn’t do much to inspire me to run him out there if I’m Dale.  Shawn Camp was just activated off of the DL, and has not pitched in majors since May 21.  We all remember that night pretty clearly *Cough Grand Slam Cough*  Henry Rodriguez’s reputation is for wildness.  Blake Parker has pitched well in a closer’s role in Iowa, but not in the majors.  James Russell had pitched the 8th.  And that’s everyone out there.

It is awful to lose a game like that one.  The Cubs have lost worse, though.  They’ll lose worse in the future.  That’s the nature of sports.  Every thrilling comeback is paired with a heart-breaking defeat.  I can’t blame Dale Sveum for going to Marmol, though.  While I am not sure I buy the Cubs trying to build trade value because at this point, I think it is obvious what he is, I am buying that the Cubs were trying to help themselves by running Marmol out and trying to get him a save.  Kevin Gregg can’t pitch every day.  They need someone else to be able to close games.  Marmol is the most logical choice.  He had been pitching much better.

Carlos Marmol is not the closer of the future.  He isn’t even the closer of the future of this season.  Kevin Gregg is the closer, for now.  He could be traded to someone looking for a closer.  At that point, Marmol is again in the running to be the closer, by mere default.  Sure, James Russell could be given a shot.  But Marmol’s history gives him a chance, no matter what.  And he deserves a crack at it.

There is no guarentee that yesterday is the last blown save for Marmol this season.  He may be thrust into that role yet again.  And we should be prepared for the worst.  But no matter the result of future games, it is the right thing for this season to keep using Marmol in high leverage situations.  There is nothing to lose but some meaningless games.

Dale Sveum’s Ever Changing Bullpen

A lot of pressure is put on a manager to effectively use his pitchers.  Knowing when to pull a starter, knowing which reliever to go to, knowing how long a reliever can go, knowing when to give a reliever a day off, knowing when a reliever has had too many days off and needs to get some work…all of it matters when it comes to managing a pitching staff.  For Dale Sveum, it’s amazing he knows who is sitting down there sometimes.  For comparison sake, here is the difference between the bullpen when the season started and today:

Cubs 2013 Opening Day Bullpen:

  • Carlos Marmol, Kyuji Fujikawa, James Russell, Shawn Camp, Hisanori Takahashi, Michael Bowden, Hector Rondon

Cubs Bullpen, May 29

  • Kevin Gregg, Carlos Marmol, James Russell, Carlos Villanueva, Rafael Dolis, Hector Rondon, Alex Burnett

    Photo: Ronald Modra, Getty Images

    Photo: Ronald Modra, Getty Images

Every bullpen goes through changes through the course of the season.  That’s not news.  The amount of turnover in the Cubs’ pen, though, has been crazy.  Shawn Camp is on the disabled list, Michael Bowden is still in DFA limbo after last week when Matt Garza came off the disabled list, Hisanori Takahashi was outrighted to Iowa, and Kyuji Fujikawa needs Tommy John surgery.  Alex Burnett was claimed off of waivers and made his debut in a scoreless ninth today.  Kevin Gregg was signed as organizational depth, or so we thought.  He’s the freakin’ closer.  KEVIN GREGG IS CLOSING AND BEING SET UP BY CARLOS MARMOL!  It’s like 2009 all over again, and that’s not exactly what any of us wanted.  In the mean time, Dolis has been up and down, and Kameron Loe was in town, got smacked around for a few weeks, and was released.

Some of the turnover is because of injuries.  They happen disproportionately to pitchers, and we all knew a spot was going to be lost in the pen when Garza returned, but the ineffectiveness of the bullpen is another factor in the turnover.  Blaming Dale for the ineffectiveness is unfair, too.  He went to players who were reliable for him last season and they have failed him, time and time again.  Both Carlos Marmol and Shawn Camp were supposed to be anchors at the back of the bullpen, and both have been removed from their roles.  Camp only because of an injury he concealed for the better part of a month, according to Sveum.  One of the more reliable relievers was Michael Bowden, who after being designated for assignment last Tuesday, must have action taken on him by Friday.  He either needs to be waived, released, or traded.  At this point, I can’t see why the Cubs wouldn’t try to sneak him through waivers and bring him right back.  It won’t be difficult to find a 40 man slot for him, with Kyuji Fujikawa sacrificing his to the 60 day disabled list.

The numbers are gruesome.  10/20 in save conversions.  Although, not all of those were in the 9th inning.  Actually, a number of those were blown in the seventh and eighth innings, which underscores the importance of the ‘set up guy.”  The Cubs have allowed 32% of inherited runners to score, which is just above the league average of 30%, according to baseball-reference.com.  None of this information is a secret.  It really only assigns numbers to what we’ve watched for the first two months of the season.

There is some hope, though.  Carlos Villanueva has been good this season, and being a veteran reliever has been a strength of his.  Kevin Gregg has been a stabilizing force since becoming the closer.  James Russell continues to be the best reliever the Cubs have had since Sean Marshall went to Cincy.  Carlos Marmol seems to be figuring it out and pitching much better when he doesn’t have the weight of closing the game on his shoulders.  Like last season, the pen seems to be getting stronger now that there is a defined, effective guy at the end.  Everything between the starter and closer then falls into place.  If the starters keep pitching like they have been, and the pen extends its brief resurgence, a run of really good baseball isn’t out of the question.

 

 

The Cubs Will Be Sellers…But Won’t Empty the Store

I think we’re all sure that there is going to be a sell off at the deadline this season again.  The extent of that sell off is yet to be determined, but in comparison to last year, it will likely be pretty minor.  The reason for that is simple…there is less there for the Cubs to sell.  That’s not to say this team is less talented than last year’s team.  Actually, the opposite is true by a wide margin.  Looking at “the plan,” though, and what the Cubs have on their roster, who is likely to go is pretty limited.

STARTING PITCHING:

NOT GOING ANYWHERE:

Jeff Samardzija, Edwin Jackson, Travis Wood

The only player in this group who has any chance of being dealt is Travis Wood.  Jeff Samardzija is a stud who is under team control through 2016.  That type of pitcher is someone you don’t let go of if you’re lacking impact pitching talent in the first place.  Travis Wood has an outside shot of being traded because of his hot start to the season, with nine quality starts in his first ten outings.  He, too, is under team control for a long time.  He won’t hit free agency until 2017.  He is exactly the type of young, cost controlled asset the regime has said to want to keep around.  Dealing him at the deadline would be a huge shock to me, and I don’t see it happening without some type of high end prospect coming back in return.  And because Travis Wood is still only a good 4-5th starter, I can’t see a team willing to cough up that much for him.  Edwin Jackson’s not going anywhere.  He was signed to be a piece for when the Cubs compete.  And he will get ample opportunity to figure out what troubles him.

MAY BE GOING SOMEWHERE:

Matt Garza

He’s only been back for a week, so I think it is entirely too early to tell whether or not he is fully back from his arm/ lat injuries.  And it is too early to tell what kind of value he has.  I know that the Cubs are looking to get back impact prospects for Garza, and if they get the right package of them, he’ll be packing his bags and headed to another city.  It is just too early to tell if any team is going to be willing to ship the Cubs the right package of prospects for a pure rental player, who is due to become a free agent at season’s end.  It would figure to be just as likely that Garza stays in Chicago all season and the Cubs slap a qualifying offer on him.  If that happens, it would be entirely possible that Garza would return to the Cubs after watching Kyle Lohse wait until just before the season to be signed.  There is an outside shot that the Cubs extend him for a contract similar to the one they offered Anibal Sanchez.  He is worth that kind of money when healthy, and if he shows that he is, he’d be worth the investment.

DON’T GET COMFORTABLE:

Scott Feldman, Carlos Villanueva

Both of these guys are attractive pieces at the deadline.  Neither makes all that much money.  Both can come out of the pen.  Both can give you a good start every five days.  That makes them the two best candidates to be out the door this July.  Feldman was asked about being flipped at his introductory conference call, so none of this should come as news to him.  Villanueva, however, signed a two year deal, so he would likely net a bit more than

Photo: Rob Carr, Getty Images

Photo: Rob Carr, Getty Images

Feldman in a trade, simply for the extra year of inexpensive control.

BULLPEN:

NOT GOING ANYWHERE:

Hector Rondon, Shawn Camp, Kyuji Fujikawa, Carlos Marmol

I know you’re all upset that Marmol is on this list.  I am, too.  He’s not worth a day old hotdog, though.  At the deadline he’ll be due about $5M, and his numbers aren’t going to make that a good investment for a team looking for a quality reliever.  The only way he comes off this list is if he has a turn around like last year and the Cubs eat most (…or all) of his remaining contract.  And he won’t bring back very much in return.  The most likely scenario with him is finishing the season and walking away in free agency.  Shawn Camp is much more likely to be released than traded.  Kyuji Fujikawa has been injured too early to have any chance at being dealt, and Hector Rondon is a Rule 5 player who the front office likes.  That makes all of them mostly untradeable.

MAY BE GOING SOMEWHERE:

James Russell, Kevin Gregg

James Russell has proven to be a valuable commodity in the bullpen the last couple of years, which increases his value immensely, but since he is under team control through 2016, it stands to reason that the team would like to keep a controllable asset like him.  There are good teams looking for left handed relievers who can get guys out on both sides of the plate, though.  And if one of them offers up a good package for James Russell, it would not be outside of the realm of possibility that he gets shipped off for multiple pieces.  Kevin Gregg is having a bit of a resurgence with the Cubs, which makes him attractive.  He’s a cheap piece who could fit into a bullpen and occasionally close for a team looking for that type of player.  He probably wouldn’t net a whole lot, but considering the Cubs were just throwing a line in the water to see what he had, any return would be a nice profit on their low risk investment.

INFIELDERS:

NOT GOING ANYWHERE:

Anthony Rizzo, Starlin Castro, Wellington Castillo

Rizzo and Castro both signed long term extensions.  Those are obvious.  Castillo is a talented young catcher who is going to get every opportunity to win this spot long term.

MAY  BE GOING SOMEWHERE:

Darwin Barney, Luis Valbuena, Cody Ransom, Dioner Navarro

The most attractive piece in this group is obviously Darwin Barney.  His glove makes him an attractive trade piece for someone looking for a really good utility infielder.  Remember, he came up as a short stop and played some third base when he was initially called up.  If his bat keeps coming along, he could be a really good long term starter at second base for a contending team with a shortage in that spot.  He’s 27, so the Cubs may not see him as a long term piece of the core group of players.  He is under team control until 2017, though.  And if he continues to make progress with the bat, he is every bit the kind of player you want at 2B on a contending Cubs team.  Luis Valbuena and Cody Ransom both offer the same kind of value for a team that Jeff Baker added last year.  They are both utility players who can swing the bat some.  They may not bring a lot in return, but that probably wouldn’t stop the front office from sending them away for some intriguing young players.

OUTFIELD:

MAY BE GOING SOMEWHERE:

Alfonso Soriano, David DeJesus, Nate Schierholtz, Scott Hairston, Ryan Sweeney

The safest bet for any of the outfielders to go anywhere is David DeJesus.  A veteran, left handed hitter who can take pitches and work counts  while offering solid defense at all three outfield positions is always in demand.  If the price is right, DDJ is out the door.  It’s just not clear what his value is.  It can’t be too much higher than it was last year, and he wasn’t traded then.  I sense that he would have been traded last year if there was a market for him, which gives me some reason to think he’s not the slam dunk to be traded that some are calling him.  Soriano is going to be shopped aggressively, and if the Cubs find a team willing to package some good pieces together and Soriano is willing to waive his no trade rights, he likely goes at the deadline.  There is too much uncertainty with Soriano, though.  He’s picky.  And he has that right.  If the Cubs get a call about the other three players, I am sure they will listen, and if they can get a prospect of two that they like, there is almost no chance they refuse.

None of this is to say that the Cubs will stand pat at the deadline.  It just isn’t clear who will or will not be going anywhere.  There are not the sure things this season, like Ryan Dempster last season.  There are attractive pieces on this team for others to look at, but none of them are necessarily special.  Matt Garza would net the most in return, theoretically, but if Jed and Theo don’t get a package they like, it is hard to believe they will trade him for the sake of trading him.  That actually applies to pretty much everybody on the roster short of Feldman.  He is a true rental, even for the Cubs, so if they can squeeze a prospect out for him, they probably wouldn’t hesitate to do so.  They may be a little more choosey with Villanueva only because they have him next season, too, and if they plan on being in the hunt next year, he’s a nice piece to have.  Or, if we’re looking at another cold assessment that leads to selling, he has value then, too.

Expect some movement from the Cubs.  Just don’t expect them to send away everything not nailed down like last year.  This is year two.  It’s time to start hanging on to some of the talent.

Rizzo and Castro Struggle, Dale’s Cubs Future, and Blaming the Fans?

In today’s loss to Pittsburgh, Starlin Castro had two hits and Anthony Rizzo wore the collar again.  That’s not really too different from the last week or so, where neither has been setting the world on fire.  In Starlin’s case, he’s been less productive all season than he has in his first three.  Anthony Rizzo has been as streaky as it gets.  He ended a 40 PA streak without a strike out with a flurry of them coming in the last four ballgames.  Ultimately, both have the weight of the world on their shoulders.  Starlin Castro is not as protected as he was when he was called up three years ago.  Derrek Lee and Aramis Ramirez are not in the line up to protect him anymore, and it has shown since the beginning of 2012.  Anthony Rizzo never got the luxury of  being in the line up with Ramirez or Lee, and has been the man since last June when he was called up.  At least Alfonso Soriano was swinging the bat when he got the call.  Early on, that hasn’t been the case at all, and Rizzo has also done some uncharacteristic swinging and missing, in an obvious effort to carry the offense.

Dale Sveum has shown up as the scapegoat for this season.  It isn’t a surprise that Dale is the one being chased with torches and pitchforks.  After all, he is the one who is hanging sliders late in games.  And it is Sveum who is swinging at pitches a foot off the plate with runners in scoring position.  It would be unimaginable to forget all of the errors in the field he’s committed, as well.  Actually, I’m being told that he hasn’t done any of those things thus far.  While he (and every other manager/ head coach in professional sports) has done some things that may not seem to be the right move, or clearly haven’t been the right move, it is absurd to blame him for the failures of the bullpen this season.  He could not have known, before the season, that Carlos Marmol was going to be as bad as he was out of the gates after as good as he was in the second half of last season.  He could not have known Kyuji Fujikawa would have a forearm injury and not tell anyone about it.  The same applies to the Shawn Camp fiasco that happened earlier this week.  While it is fair to question some of the moves Dale has made in some situations, to pick him apart and blame him for the failures of the team would be a disservice, especially since he doesn’t get the credit he deserves for the development that he has overseen.  The Cubs were the worst defensive team in baseball in 2011.  They are much better now (spare me the errors, crap.  Those are 100% subjective.  Peripherals say the Cubs are much better than they were in 2011).  They are much better base runners.  They make some silly plays on the bases now, but they are errors or aggression, and not errors of not knowing what’s going on.  All of Anthony Rizzo, Starlin Castro, and Jeff Samardzija have grown in the time Sveum has been around.  Darwin Barney won a Gold Freaking Glove.  Matt Garza stayed with a 61 win team after being shut down in July because of the atmosphere of the clubhouse when a lot of players go home to rehab.  That speaks volumes to Dale Sveum’s ability to manage a clubhouse and a ball club.  He should get the credit he deserves if he is going to get the unfair criticisms of being the reason a team with a talent deficiency is 10 under .500.

All of that leads me to this…when do the fans start looking in the mirror and blaming themselves?  The obvious answer is never.  Because nobody wants to think they’re the reason for anything.  We as a fan base, collectively, have a lot more effect on things than we might think.  Starlin Castro and Anthony Rizzo are two very rich players who fans are always talking about being the future of the team and the cornerstones of a team that lead the Cubs fans to the promised land.  That’s a heavy burden on two kids.  Because they are kids.  23 years old is young if they were starting in Iowa.  They are both starting every day at Wrigley Field.  While I am not tremendously older than either of those two, I do know that I have undergone a major transformation in the years since I was 23.  That’s just out of college for most people.  These two are being counted on to win a World Series where one hasn’t been won in 105 years!  Are they feeling the pressure of expectations levied on them by media and fans?  I can’t answer for sure, but I would venture to guess the obvious answer is yes.  It shows in their performance.  They are both trying to make things happen when nothing is there to be made…and it is hurting them and the team.  Matt Garza has already addressed the negativity around the team this season from the fans.  Since he’s still new to the whole Cubs atmosphere, he must not realize the negativity has been going on for a long time.  Dale Sveum isn’t the first “moron,” “idiot,” “over-thinker,” or “washed up player” to come through here and be run out of town by the fans.  It happened to Mike Quade, Dusty Baker, and Don Baylor…all in the last 12 years.  It probably would have happened to Lou Piniella, too, but he got the hell out of town before he could be chased down Sheffield Avenue by an angry mob.  All of the things that I love about being a Cubs fan…the passion, the loyalty, the undying desire to see the Cubs win it all…have to make being on a team that doesn’t win it all an unmitigated hell.  We’re the people who booed Carlos Marmol before the home opener this season.  We’re the people who booed Alfonso Soriano unmercifully for not running out a line drive that was caught at third base on national television.  We’re the people who, inexplicable, found some cause to boo Aramis Ramirez when he made his first visit to Wrigley last season as a member of the Brewers.

And for what?  Because every year has to be THE YEAR?  I’ve said it before, other bloggers have said it before, and the front office and manager have said it before if you listened closely to what they’ve said…this is not the year.  This is another completely developmental year.  Theo, and I paraphrase, said it’s either playoffs or protected pick.  And if you hooked him up to a polygraph, he’d probably tell you playoffs were never really an option.  He’s smart.  He knows who is on the line up card Dale fills out everyday.  It’s not a playoff team.

I’m not saying to applaud mediocrity.  I’m not saying to ignore mistakes and to not boo a lack of effort.  I’m saying that we aren’t helping.  The players that are running out there everyday feel the weight of a fan base pushing down on their shoulders.  And there are only a few who are out there everyday.  Castro.  Rizzo.  Barney.  Those are the ones who will have the best chance of being a part of the team that does win it all.  Crushing them now is just counterproductive.