Tagged: David Bell

The Mythical Regressions of Starlin Castro and Anthony Rizzo

There has been a great deal of discussion about why Dale Sveum was fired, and this post is not a discussion about that particular topic, although it is an interesting one.  This post is to discuss whether or not Anthony Rizzo and Starlin Castro went through a significant regression during the 2013 season.

The short answer to that question is no*.

First, let’s examine Rizzo’s season.  I will say this, a guy who came into the season with 521 career plate appearances in the majors isn’t regressing in his FIRST full major league season.  It just doesn’t work that way.  He had 690 PAs this season in 160 games, which was more than the 136 career games he had coming in.  When a season counts for over half of your career numbers, it wasn’t regression.  This season was about adjustment for Rizzo.  His .233/.323/.419 line isn’t all that spectacular, but his power numbers were.  Before the season, I predicted he would hit between 25 and 30 HRs and drive in between 80 and 90 runs.  I didn’t miss by much.  He finished with 23 HR and 80 RBI.  For a first full season, not too shabby.  When tossing in his 40 doubles, two triples, and 76 walks, there is no reason not to be excited about the kid’s ability.  It is fair to say that after a hot start, he got considerably colder, hitting ten of his home runs and driving in 36 of his runs before June.  The number that really sticks out to me is .258.  That was his Batting Average on Balls in Play (BABIP).  That is much lower than his .310 mark in 2012, and is inconsistent with his career marks, save his brief period with the Padres in 2011, which can be explained, in part, by small sample size.  He did hit more fly balls (30.2% in 2012 to 37.9% in 2013) and his line drive percentage dropped about 5 points to 19.6%.  None of that to me suggests that he is broken or regressed.  It suggests that a young player was undergoing an adjustment after a successful initial prolonged stint of major league baseball.  In the field, he was as advertised.  In fact, a case can be made to grant Anthony Rizzo a Gold Glove.  His 16 defensive runs saved was the best among first basemen in MLB.  His Ultimate Zone Rating was third in MLB and topped the National League.  And his 43 plays made out of zone also topped the NL.  To me, this doesn’t look like a regression.  This looks like a kid learning, taking some lumps, but still performing pretty damn well.  He may not win a Gold Glove because the award doesn’t go to the most deserving player, but Rizzo has as good a resume as anyone for it…in just his first full major league season.

Starlin Castro is a lightning rod.  This was, statistically (in some cases) his worst major league season.  Was it regression?  Probably not.  Consider this:

“He’s a pretty unique hitter. I think we made efforts to introduce him to the concept of getting pitches he can really drive because in the long run that will benefit him. But if that can’t be accomplished without him being himself as a hitter than you just have to let time play its course and he’ll naturally evolve that way.”

And…

“With Starlin, if you try to throw too much at him — which maybe at times we’ve been guilty of — who knows, I think we’ve always been conscious of letting him be himself.  In his case he’s at his best if he’s single-mindedly himself.”

Those comments coming from Theo Epstein (via Jesse Rogers of ESPNChicago.com) on the organizational decision to try to alter Starlin’s approach at the plate.   That makes me feel a whole lot better about his .245/.284/.347 this season.  It is easy to say he regressed, but if he tried something that simply didn’t work for him and he is able to start fresh in spring as the player we saw in 2010 and 2011, then 2013 will be a forgotten blip on the career of the still only 23 year old shortstop.  It’s not a regression until it happens in subsequent seasons because, for now, there is at least a plausible explanation for Starlin Castro’s season other than “he got worse.”  Defensively, everybody is going to get caught up in the “mental gaffes” and the errors, but the reality is his defense has taken some major steps forward.  His 22 errors are his career best to this point.  That has to do directly with the work done with Castro with former manager Dale Sveum, former infield instructor Pat Listach and current infield instructor (for now) David Bell.  He cut throwing errors down from 16 in 2011 to eight in each of the last two seasons for a total of 16.  The coaching staff worked on his feet, got him to get into good fielding and throwing positions, and it has made a positive difference.  It will remain up to Castro to continue with the things that he has done to cut his errors down.  He was third in the NL in plays made out of zone, and 87% of his chances resulted in outs, which was relatively unchanged from his 88% mark in 2012, but still up from the 85% marks he put out in 2010 and 2011.  This suggests that the coaching he’s gotten is to make sure he gets at least one out, which is a step forward for him from his first two seasons of trying to do way too much.  None of this is to say Starlin doesn’t have work to do.  We all saw he has some work to do defensively, but much of the bad stuff came early and he got better later in the season.  That is to say, there wasn’t a regression in his defense as the season wore on, which says something about the maturity he likes to get hammered for…since he was struggling at the plate and it did not transfer into the field.

There are words to be used to describe Anthony Rizzo and Starlin Castro this season.  Disappointing, which comes with the expectations placed on young talent with long term contract extensions in hand.  It is entirely too early to say they got worse, however.  Regression doesn’t happen in one season.  In Rizzo’s case, one full season.  He never had the time to establish a standard of performance from which to regress with because less than one full season’s worth of at-bats doesn’t cut it.  In Castro’s, it doesn’t come in one season where the approach he took at the plate was tinkered with by the organization.  That’s not regression.  If he has another season like last season, then we can talk about regression.  Until then, it’s too soon.

Since I wasn’t in the room to decide on Dale Sveum’s fate, I cannot say why exactly he was “relieved of his duties as manager.”  I can say that if it was “regression,” of Castro and Rizzo, then he got a raw deal.  More than likely, it has something to do with the message he was delivering.  After all, you can’t tell your most talented two players that “The bottom line is you have to perform. Whether you need more development or you decide all those kind of things. There’s still that accountability,” without it happening to you.  Isn’t that a cruel irony?

*Meatball stopped reading at this spot.  He is currently telling me I’m an idiot on Twitter, telling me that is why Dale was fired (maybe it was), and that I should look at the numbers (I did). 

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As Deadline Passes, Cubs’ Priority Should Be Extending Dale Sveum

In just about two days time, the non-waiver trade deadline will come and go.  The Cubs, who have been more active than any team in the month of July, will see a considerable slow down in activity with the passing of the draft, the initial international free agent signing period, and the trade deadline.  That leaves them with an ample opportunity to take care of what may be the most vital piece of business they have left before next season: Extend the contract of Manager, Dale Sveum.

Photo: Brian Cassella / Chicago Tribune

Photo: Brian Cassella / Chicago Tribune

As Theo Epstein’s hand picked successor to Mike Quade, Dale Sveum has done everything the Cubs could have imagined…and more.  He deserves to go into next season with some job security, and the Cubs should go into this off-season, where they will surely try to add players who can help the major league team take the next step toward respectability, with stability in the manager’s office.

Although his 109-156 record isn’t outstanding, it is also not his fault.  He walked into a complete overhaul of a roster of albatross contracts, aging veterans, and young players who really weren’t major league players.  To make matters worse, the front office either traded or shut down major portions of his starting rotation…in both 2012 and 2013.  The bullpens he’s had to work with have been largely unproven young players or veteran retreads (*cough cough* Shawn Camp *cough*), and it has shown in the win-loss column.

Dale Sveum was hired to do two main things: Keep the clubhouse together and develop young talent.  He’s done exceedingly well on both fronts in his first two seasons.

On the player development front, the biggest feather in his cap is the coaching staff he’s put together.  While he may have had Rudy Jaramillo and Pat Listach as hold overs for either part or all of last season, the additions of Dave McKay, David Bell, and Chris Bosio have all been successful.  Dave McKay helped turn Alfonso Soriano into a serviceable left fielder.  After years of being afraid of the wall and hopping around like a wounded bunny rabbit, Soriano had the highest UZR among NL left fielders last season.  It’s amazing what a little coaching will do after Soriano admitted that he hadn’t gotten any outfield instruction before last season, from either Quade’s staff or Lou Piniella before him.  Anthony Rizzo is another success, as Sveum, the former Brewers hitting coach, brought his hands down, shortening his swing, and making him better than the .141/.281.242 hitter he was with the Padres in 2011.  The anecdotes serve as evidence of a whole: the Cubs are a vastly improved defensive team from the years before Sveum.  And the approach at the plate is starting to get better, too.  Nothing happens over night, but the results are starting to show up.  In spite of all of the player movement, trades, and lost veterans in the clubhouse, the Cubs have a winning record since May 26 (30-25).  While the sample is small, the results matter.  Even with major bullpen issues and a complete inability to hit with runners in scoring position, the Cubs are playing competitively.  The steps in the right direction are adding up.

The clubhouse is the other place Sveum was asked to thrive.  As a former top prospect, he can relate to the likes of Anthony Rizzo, Starlin Castro, and soon Javier Baez, et al.  He can also relate to the 25th man on the roster because that’s where his career ended after a devastating leg injury.  He knows the weight of expectations and he knows the plight of the role player who is tasked to sit and wait for his name to be called, and the need to be ready.  He relates to his players because he’s been there and done that.  And while he took some undeserved criticism for his loyalty to Shawn Camp from fans, it was not his job to get rid of Camp.  It was the front office’s.  Having his player’s back, especially one who he’s had history with, was the only move he could make that doesn’t send the alienating “as soon as I see trouble, I’m going to turn my back on you.” message.  That’s a terrible image to portray to the rest of the team.  The fact that Dale said it was tough to see Camp go may have made fans cringe, but it probably made the team smile a little bit.  When veterans like Matt Garza hang around after being shut down with 2 1/2 months left in a 100 loss season, it says as much as there is to say about a clubhouse…especially when Garza admitted if it had been Quade’s clubhouse, he would have gone home.  And being able to sign quality free agents like Edwin Jackson after a 100 loss season doesn’t happen if the player thinks the manager is a bum who can’t manage a clubhouse.  Think about it.  Has anything obscenely negative come out of the clubhouse during Sveum’s tenure?  For a team with the win-loss record the Cubs have had, you’d think there would be something.  Especially in a media market like Chicago.  But it’s been remarkably quiet.  Which means the bad stuff is being handled where it should…in house.

Dale has been charged with over-seeing a complete rebuild, which couldn’t have been fun, couldn’t have been easy, and couldn’t have happened in any worse a place than Wrigley Field, where every year is “THE YEAR” to a group of people who only watch the game and read the box score in the paper each morning.  The reality is, last year, this year, and probably next year are not “THE YEAR.”  But the team is heading in the right direction in spite of the instability among the player personnel.  That is a credit to Sveum, and the right thing to do is ensure that he never gets to “lame duck” status in the last year of a contract with a team, who next year may be able to win consistently for the first time in his tenure.

Besides.  He got shot in the face and laughed it off.  How cool is it to have a manager like that?