Tagged: Kris Bryant

Too Early To Quit On Vitters and Jackson

Two years, in sports, is an eternity.  In the last two years, the Cubs went from being among the bottom of the farm system rankings to among the top, if not the very top.  Over the last two summers, we have swooned over the bat speed of Javier Baez, gushed at Albert Almora’s defensive ability in center, looked wide eyed at Kris Bryant’s power, and Soler-gasmed at one of the biggest signings of the Epstein/ Hoyer era.  Two of the cornerstone prospects, two years ago, were Brett Jackson and Josh Vitters.  Now, in some circles, those guys are busts.

In every respect, it is completely unfair to call either Jackson or Vitters a bust.  Neither has had an extended look at the major league level.  And both have performed in the minor leagues.  The “bust” conversations are had among those who have expected to see them in the majors at this point.  It doesn’t help that the only thing we heard about either of them was Brett Jackson being demoted to AA Tennessee while he continued to try to control the strike out problems that have plagued him.  We didn’t actually hear anything at all about Josh Vitters.  Mostly because it’s pretty hard to talk about a guy who didn’t play a whole lot because of persistent injury issues in 2013.

Josh Vitters is making is overdue transition to being a full time outfielder, which can help mitigate his defensive struggles.  After only 100 plate appearances at Iowa last season, and 88 at-bats, Vitters needs to bounce back from a shortened and injury plagued 2013.  Thing of it is, when he played, he was fine.  his .295/.380/.511 triple slash line in an age 23 season in AAA isn’t anything to gloss over, even if it wasn’t very much.  The kid can hit.  He’s performed every step of the way in the minors, albeit with an adjustment period after arriving.  A broader view of his numbers shows us that in 552 plate appearances in AAA have him at .302/.361/.513.  The biggest knock on Vitters is that he was selected so long ago that people forget that he will not turn 25 until the end of August next season.  If he can get and stay healthy and come to spring training ready, Vitters has to have as realistic a shot as anyone at making the roster, for two reasons.  First, the Cubs are not going to be competitive next season and it would make sense to get a look at him.  And second, because on a team full of fourth and fifth outfielders, there are not clear runaways for roster spots, outside of Junior Lake, Nate Schierholtz, and Ryan Sweeney.  Even if he doesn’t make the Opening Day 25 man roster, it would be a surprise not to see him get an extended look in the majors next season, if for no other reason than to see what he can do there.  His 2012 call-up was the very definition of a small sample size.  109 plate appearances were unspectacular (.121/.193/.202), but it’s ridiculous to give up on a kid who was 22 and playing in mop up duty in a lost season.

Brett Jackson is just over a year older than Vitters, but is similarly forgotten.  He will be turning 26 in early August.  Also, like Vitters, his 2013 was hampered by injuries.  Starting in Spring Training with shoulder inflammation and then having toe and calf problems as the season wore on, Jackson never really got it going.  He was limited to 367 plate appearances between Arizona, Tennessee, and Iowa, and his strike out problems persisted through a reworked swing after spending last winter with former manager, Dale Sveum.  When Jackson has made contact, he’s been fine, with BABIPs generally hanging between .350 and .400 through his full minor league seasons.  It’s the hole in his swing that drives down his average.   One thing Jackson does have going for him is his walk rate, which has been at or above 10% for most of his career, including his brief stint in the majors in 2012.  Between his speed and power, he too has ability that can’t be simply discarded because of an arbitrary timeline for success.  Also, like Vitters, it would be a surprise if he didn’t see some time at the major league level this season, assuming he stays healthy.

Vitters and Jackson are both obviously talented.  They would not have been selected in the first round of their respective drafts if that were not true.  Both would have likely seen time in Chicago last season if it weren’t for injuries.  This season is important for both, to stay healthy and to take the next step.  With Almora, Soler, and potentially Kris Bryant coming behind them in the outfield, their opportunities may be limited by the surge of the newer prospects.  Still, it is far too early to write off either one.  We still don’t know what they are or what they can be, whether that be solid regulars or AAAA players like Bryan LaHair.  And as evidenced by both of these players, the value (real or perceived) of a prospect can change quickly, so it is still in the best interest of the organization to try to get everything they can from these two assets.

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Cubs Have Holes to Fill This Winter

Now that the World Series is over and the Cardinals lost (HOORAY!), we can get to the task at hand.  The off-season.  The Cubs are chocked full of needs this winter.  Those will have to be addressed going into 2014 to keep the rebuilding plan on schedule.

These are the most pressing…

1.  Find a new manager

After the firing of Dale Sveum, the next guy to lead the Cubs on-field is the first concern.  With the playoffs having ended, the obstacle of candidates still playing is over.  To be honest, I don’t care who they hire, as long as he fits the mold of what the front office is looking for.  That Dale was the guy for a while, then suddenly became not the guy doesn’t matter.  Great organizations are stable.  And since 2010, this will be the fourth manager.  That’s not stable.  Find the guy.  The right guy.  So we’re not going through this mess again in two years.

2.  Find some outfield depth

After losing Alfonso Soriano, David DeJesus, and Scott Hairston to midseason trades, it is going to be important for the Cubs to replace that lost depth at the major league level.  The preference would be to sign veterans on short (1-2 years) deals while the youngsters get ready.  With Nate Schierholtz, Ryan Sweeney, and Junior Lake, there is a need for two more outfielders.  Preferably one who can play center and one who hits right handed.  To be clear, I do not see Shin Soo Choo or Jacoby Ellsbury as viable options.  I have no visions of the Cubs spending on either of those players with the talent that is coming behind them.  I do see players like Curtis Granderson, Grady Sizemore, Corey Hart, and Tyler Colvin as options.  Colvin is the standard “buy low flier” that this front office has taken in the past, and with his talent and familiarity with the Cubs, and the admission that the Stewart – Colvin trade may have been a mistake, he could be back.  The others are veterans who have had some success, but have also had injury issues.  Any resurgence could make them trade bait in July, and they all likely come relatively cheap.  David DeJesus is also an option if the Rays decide not to pick up his option for next season

3. Trade Darwin Barney

The popular defensive wizard is not part of the core.  He’s a below average hitter.  And he’s getting a bit older.  There is a market for him, though.  His value, however, is at its highest point right now.  He’s just now entering arbitration.  Teams who have a need at second base can use him.  The Cubs do not have that need.  They are stocked full of middle infielders, from Starlin Castro to Javier Baez and Arismendy Alcantara, Logan Watkins, and Luis Valbuena, the Cubs have no shortage of middle infield options.  All of whom are younger than Barney.  And all of whom possess greater offensive upside and the potential to continue good defense at second base in the future.  The return for Barney won’t be ground breaking, but it should be a decent prospect, or maybe two if Epstein and Hoyer break out the mask and gun.  Now, though, is the best and most logical time to move him.

4.  Address the rotation

The rotation was surprisingly good last season, throughout the year.  There was a lot of depth that withstood trades, and some players emerged as legitimate long term options.  Travis Wood showed that he is a solid mid to back of the rotation starter.  Jake Arrieta showed that he is still talented and should get a shot going forward.  Edwin Jackson had a rough first year, but with his contract and history, he will be back in the rotation next season, and I would venture to guess he has a better second year with the Cubs.  It is the very top of the rotation and the very bottom that should be addressed.   Jeff Samardzija walked more, stuck out fewer, and allowed more runners to score in 2013 than 2012.  The differences aren’t startling, but they exist.  Could it have been fatigue from the most innings in a season he’s thrown?  Frustration from another near 100 losses?  Displeasure over his contract situation?  A combination of all three?  I don’t have the answer.  What I do have the answer to is Samardzija getting rocked a number of times.  And it happening a number of times at home.  That’s not an ace.  That’s a third in the rotation type pitcher, at best.  I am not sold on Japanese stud Masahiro Tanaka being an answer at the top of the rotation, either.  Too many Japanese pitchers have flamed out because of arm issues.  I understand his stuff is excellent, and he’s still young.   That may make him a nice investment, but not for the $100+ million it’s going to cost.  If the Cubs get him, I’ll hope for the best, but I won’t be at all surprised with the worst.  As far as the back end of the rotation is concerned, bringing back Scott Baker, giving Chris Rusin a shot at a full season, and low cost free agents are all options.

5.  Back-up catcher

I have a tough time with the idea of signing a Brian McCann (because of age and injury every bit as much as his high douche factor).  All things being equal, I would hope the starting catcher market doesn’t treat Dioner Navarro as he would like, and he comes back.  He had a nice year, seemed to have a good relationship with Wellington Castillo, and is a reliable backstop.  Whoever comes in should take a back seat to Castillo, though.  Big money free agent catchers shouldn’t (and probably won’t) be a priority.  If the Cubs can land a guy like Jarrod Saltalamacchia for a decent price, great.  if not, a LH hitting backup will work just fine.

One of the great parts about baseball is how this is going to play out throughout the off-season.  The Cubs are not going to compete for a World Series next season, most likely.  It could, though, bring the first wave of prospects to Wrigley Field.  Javier Baez and Kris Bryant very well could debut with the big league club at some point next summer.  In addition, could be up after being acquired in trades.  It appears that the worst is behind the Cubs in the rebuild.  Much of the “acquire talent at all costs” is over because of the amount of talent in the organization.  The time now is for the build up.  While the Cubs will continue to add pieces and make the team better and organization healthier, this off-season is the beginning of the build up of a contender.  Whether it be adding placeholders for a prospect, adding leadership to help those prospects grow, or the eventual hiring of a new manager, the fruits of two years of painful big league play are beginning to ripen.

Look no further than what’s been going on in Arizona.  Let the off-season begin!

 

TRADE DEADLINE: Garza Could Fetch a Core Piece At Deadline

As the deadline approaches, the Cubs are in a full court press, trying to make moves to improve the overall talent level of the organization.  The good news is, they are actually well positioned to add one or more core pieces to the roster.  While it will probably take more than one of the Cubs’ chips to get a piece that would be significant enough to add to the big league roster right away, the Cubs do have Matt Garza, who can fetch a player who has upside and is Major League ready.

There are some destinations where Matt Garza could turn into a piece who is part of the team that Theo Epstein, Jed Hoyer, and presumably, Dale Sveum are looking to push into the playoffs.  And those teams could all use a player like Garza to make a push in the second half of this season.  While it remains to be seen what happens, Garza is the player who will net the biggest reward, and it is he who should be watched the closest as the next month unfolds.

Rangers

Last year, it was reported that the Rangers were in on Matt Garza before being scared off by his medicals and settling on a deal for Ryan Dempster.  They were also the team that took Geovany Soto and sent Barret Loux when Jacob Brigham had a medical issue.  The point is, the Cubs and Rangers are no strangers to making deals, and the magic could be rekindled this year.

3B Mike Olt:  It is only a guess that Olt was the piece the Cubs were in on when trying to move Garza to Texas last summer.  He has the potential to be a nice core piece, especially if Kris Bryant has to move off the hot corner.  Keith Law rates him as a plus defender.  He probably won’t hit for a huge average, but he’ll get on base with his fair share of walks (12.4 walk rate at AAA this season).  He also has the power to hit the ball out.  The consensus is that all he needs is at-bats, and if he were to come to Chicago this season, there is no good reason why he couldn’t get his share of them immediately.

Padres

The Cubs have been rumored to be discussing a Matt Garza trade to the Padres.  A deal here would make some sense, considering Jed Hoyer and Jason McLeod came to the Cubs from San Diego.  Familiarity can breed success, so being familiar with the players as deeply as the front office knows these players make the likelihood of a successful trade a little greater.

2B/3B Jedd Gyorko:  One thing the Cubs have done successfully is add big bats who will hit for a ton of power.  Gyorko isn’t one of those guys.  While he is playing second for the Padres this season, he is a natural third baseman, who will hit for good average, but will not put up gaudy power numbers.  He has a .284/.341/.461 so far this season, to go with eight long balls and 25 driven in while playing at a park and in a division that is not conducive to big time hitting numbers.  Coming to the more hitter friendly NL Central could really help his offensive game blossom, while giving the Cubs a good hitting third baseman to compliment the power that is already in the organization.

Dodgers

The Dodgers are eight under .500.  They are also only a mere seven games out of first place.  You know they’re not afraid to spend money and to take on as many good players as they can.  Anything short of the playoffs would be a disaster for the Dodgers and their obscene payroll.  And, after having too much starting pitching as the season started, are now in a position where another arm couldn’t hurt.

RHP Zach Lee:  While Lee is not ready for “The Show,” he is an athletic pitcher who has some solid middle of the rotation potential.  At the AA level, he would be the most developed Cubs’ prospect who is pitching this season.  It would be a surprise if he were the only piece coming back in return for Garza, but he would be a strong centerpiece if the Dodgers were so inclined to try to bring Garza out west.

Indians

The Indians haven’t been good recently, but are in the hunt this season.  They also have terrible pitching.  This is a match made in heaven.

RHP Trevor Bauer:  He is pitching much better in the early going in his Indians career after being traded from Arizona last off-season.  He would be a heavy price to pay for half of a season of Matt Garza.  Veteran pitching with his playoff experience is hard to come by, though.  While this is the least likely of any scenario, there is no denying the mid to upper 90s fastball to go with a very good curve ball.  Pairing the 22 year old Bauer up with Jeff Samardzija at the front end of the Cubs’ rotation for years would make for a solid 1-2 punch.

Cubs

The last destination for Garza is one where he doesn’t actually leave.  He’s had some injury issues the last couple of seasons, but throughout his career, he’s been durable, he’s been tested, and he’s had success as a player who’s gone to the World Series with the Rays.  Extending him for a contract similar to the one the Cubs dangled to Anibal Sanchez would be a good move, especially if the Cubs don’t get a deal they like at the deadline.

TRADE DEADLINE: Cubs Have Areas of Obvious Need

Through the beginning of their tenure, Theo Epstein and Jed Hoyer have done nothing short of a masterful job of adding quality talent to the Cubs’ minor league system.  Between the inherited talent and the added talent, the Cubs now have what is a consensus top ten system in the game, and it is likely to get better with the addition of second overall pick Kris Bryant, international signings, and the trade deadline.

Not all of the positions in the organization are overflowing with talent, however.  With the international signing and the trade deadline looming, there are some clear areas of need.  To build the caliber of organization that the team needs to have and the front office wants to grow, weaknesses need to be addressed.

The focus needs to be on positions with glaring deficiencies.  There are positions that are strong at the lower levels of the minor leagues without much talent at the top end, while some are stronger throughout the system or aren’t strong at all.  The focus needs to be on picking up pieces to build a strong pipeline to the majors sooner than 2015-2016 and strengthen areas without much talent to speak of at all.

1. Pitching

This is a no-brainer.  Theo Epstein and Jed Hoyer have acknowledged that the Cubs will use the international pool and trade deadline to strengthen this piece of the puzzle.  There are some nice pieces at just about every level of the organization, but not nearly enough.  The best prospect in the organization is Arodys Vizcaino, who was acquired last July in the Paul Maholm trade.  When he gets healthy, he has front of the rotation stuff, but his arm trouble might limit him to a relief role.  Pierce Johnson just got his long overdue promotion to Daytona, and he appears to be on his way.  Jeff Samardzija and Travis Wood are nice young pieces at the ML level.  The focus has been on arms in the draft, but none of them appear to be impact arms, with the Cubs grabbing position players with their last two top ten picks.  The clear lack of high end, projectable pitching talent makes it job one for the Cubs this July.  They could start out by signing Cuban prospect Miguel Alfredo Gonzalez.  He’s 26, and could realistically start in the upper levels of the minor leagues this season, if not at the major league level…and all he costs is money.  Which the Cubs don’t seem opposed to spending on international free agents.

2. Catching

Beyond Wellington Castillo and Steve Clevenger, there isn’t a lot of strength to one of the keystone positions.  While Castillo is a young player who is looking more and more like an everyday backstop, organizational depth is paramount at a position where injuries mount and nobody can catch everyday.  Dioner Navarro is a stop gap at the major league level.  While the Cubs can be active in signing veteran catchers for a year or two at a time, there is a ton of value in bringing catchers through the system who have a history with the pitchers coming up through the system.

3. Corner Infielders

Count me among the guys who really likes Christian Villanueva.  And Jeimer Candelario.  And Anthony Rizzo.  Beyond that, there are a ton of question marks.  Josh Vitters may never figure it out defensively.  I am not sold on the idea that Kris Bryant can stick at third base.  Dan Vogelbach appears to best project as a designated hitter.  Junior Lake is looking more and more like a super utility player.  Luis Valbuena is a utility player who is having a nice season as a starter for a rebuilding team, but in no way should or would be a starter on a playoff caliber team.  It really boils down to defense with this group.  While first base at the major league level appears to be filled for the foreseeable future, third base is a bit of a black hole and there is almost no depth in the system at first.  One thing that helps this group along is the potential for Javier Baez or Starlin Castro to slide over to third and fill the slot whenever Baez makes his way up to the majors.

Photo: Paul R. Gierhart/MiLB.com

Photo: Paul R. Gierhart/MiLB.com

4. Center Field 

The cupboard at the major league level is bare.  David DeJesus, Dave Sappelt, and Ryan Sweeney are really nice filler material during the rebuild, but they are similar to Luis Valbuena.  All three are reserves on playoff teams, and none of them figure to be around for the long haul.  Albert Almora looks fantastic at Kane County thus far.  He’s a few years away from being an option, though.  It is up in the air if Brett Jackson makes use of his incredible talent because he is endlessly afflicted by the strike out.  Jae-Hoon Ha and Matt Szczur both look like the DeJesus/ Sweeney type, as in they could be spare outfielders who can play all over as defensive replacements.  For those reasons, it wouldn’t hurt to add a center fielder with upside if the opportunity presents itself.

5. Corner Outfielders

There isn’t much for depth here in Iowa, but there is a lot to like about the potential for corner outfielders in the Cubs organization.  Jorge Soler is obviously the crown jewel of these guys at any level, but he won’t be in Chicago until September of 2014 at the absolute earliest.  The better bet is 2015 at some point.  Kris Bryant, to me, is probably going to end up in the corner not occupied by Soler, should everything go right.  This is a group that could also include Junior Lake, Josh Vitters if his defense stays as shaky at third as it has been.  Reggie Golden is at Kane County and is a sleeper to me.  Overall, I like the group of players the Cubs have stocked up on that could be turned into corner outfielder, where hitting is most important, and where defensive liabilities like Vitters can be hidden.  Again, it wouldn’t hurt to add to it if the opportunity arises, but there are definitely better places to add pieces.

6. Middle Infield

Starlin Castro, Darwin Barney, Logan Watkins, Arismendy Alcantara, Ronald Torreyes, Javier Baez…need I say more?  There is a legit prospect at just about every level of the minor leagues in the middle infield.  And the major league level has a two time All-Star and a Gold Glove winner in the line-up everyday, neither of whom is old by any stretch of the imagination.  The middle infield is the strength of the organization, and unless you’re getting Jurickson Profar in a deal, this area isn’t a priority in the least.

There is no argument to be made that the Cubs wouldn’t be best served to get the best players they can, regardless of the positions they play.  Weaknesses cannot be ignored, however, and the goal when moving players like Matt Garza should be to find high level talent in areas of need, which would make the trade good for both sides.  Again, if the Rangers are parting with Profar (for example), you have to pull the trigger.  Talent like that doesn’t come around very often.  At the end of the day though, the focus has to be on adding impact arms that can make a difference in the near future and catchers to work with them coming up through system.

 

The Cubs Can’t (And Shouldn’t) Try to Win Now

In 2011, the Cubs and Cardinals shared something in common.  Both dreamed of 2012 with Albert Pujols in the line-up.  Jerseys,

shirsies, and Cubs’ gear with the signature 5 on the back started appearing.  And then Jim Hendry gave him a hug.  And we all leaned forward.  And then Hendry got fired and Theo Epstein got the job to lead the front office after spending mega-dollars in Boston.  We all thought it was a sure thing that the Cubs would sign Pujols or former Brewer, Prince Fielder.  And then the Cubs traded for Anthony Rizzo.  And the dreaming was over.

The start of a rebuild was upon us.  None of us thought it was 101 losses bad.  We didn’t think we would be waiting until 2015 to be realistic contenders.  That is, however, where we are.  And it is exactly where we should be.

My favorite conversations are with the people who talk about “winning now.”  We should buy free agents to win now while prospects develop so that we have a good major league product while we develop a minor league product.  The reality, though, is that logic is flawed.  Because the evidence suggests that it fails just about 100% of the time.

The New York Yankees are the poster-children for throwing money at flaws.  In fact, the Yankees have spent, since 2001, roughly $2.375 BILLION on payroll.  They have appeared in the World Series only three times (2001, 2003, and 2009), and have only won once (2009).  They spent about $792 million per World Series appearance.  Meanwhile, the Cubs have spent about $1.294 billion on payroll for three PLAYOFF appearances, and no World Series berths in the same time frame.  Every year, the Cubs are in the top half (even now) in total payroll and have had among the highest in the National League over the last 13 years.

The teams who are winning are those who draft their players, develop them, bring them up, and learn to win at the MLB level.  There is a reason the Rays are one of the most stable franchises in baseball now, in spite of having to let players like Matt Garza, Carl Crawford, James Shields, and likely soon will let David Price walk out the door.  They do their work on the draft and turn their talent into contending quality major league teams.  The Giants have done the same thing with home grown Tim Lincecum, Matt Cain, Buster Posey, et al winning two of the last three championships.  The Cardinals refused to pay Albert Pujols more than he was worth.  They set a number and a length for him, and refused to budge.  He went to the Angels, and his legs stayed in St. Louis.  Meanwhile, he has eight years left on his contract.  He’ll be a player who can’t run, can’t be traded, and has to be paid until 2021.  Sound familiar?  A certain left fielder has drawn the ire of Cubs fans for failing to live up to his deal, and Pujols has an even worse contract.

Like it did with the Rays, the Phillies when they won with a core of Cole Hamels, Ryan Howard, Chase Utley, and Jimmy Rollins (all home grown), and the Giants, it will take time for the Cubs to roll the snowball of building talent into a top down organizational juggernaut like the current Cardinals (who have the best record in baseball and one of  the best farm systems to pair with it), but it is the right direction.

In the coming free agent class, there are no game changers to make the Cubs instant contenders.  That is just another flaw in a completely unsustainable plan.  Robinson Cano is the only potential free agent who could make an impact on a line up, and it is highly unlikely that he leaves New York.  Shin Soo Choo is a nice piece, but he isn’t pushing the Cubs into the category of making a deep October run.  Jacoby Ellsbury is a good player who may finally be healthy, but he is nearing the wrong side of 30, and has an injury history that makes him a salary liability.  And if/ when the Albert Almora, Jorge Soler, Brett Jackson, Kris Bryant group gets to Chicago, they have an old player with a big contract blocking them.  The pitching isn’t much better in the coming off-season.  The most accomplished free agent pitcher to be is already on the Cubs’ roster in Matt Garza.

Losing games isn’t any fun.  It’s easy to understand the frustration of watching the team lose games they could win, sink to the bottom of the division in May, and sell off veteran pieces for players who may turn into nothing.  But throwing money at free agents and trading every nice piece in the farm for a chance at one year is how the Cubs got to this point in the first place.  They are much better served developing their players, bringing them to the big league level, and trading prospects only when the return is a player who can be useful for sustained success.  Money is best spent in the manner the front office has shown that it is going to spend it…on its own core pieces.  Keeping young talent in-house for mutually beneficial deals is a very good way to spend money, and the Cubs’ position as a big market team should be able to allow them to hang on to their players, and not have to purge them when they have out-performed their contracts.

An unfortunate side effect to doing it the right way is that it takes time.  And it will.  Anything worth doing, though, is worth doing right.  Doing it right takes time, and good things come to those who wait, and all those other things we were told when we were kids.  They’re all true.

2013 First Year Player Draft Signing Database

As the Cubs sign their picks, this list will reflect who has been signed and how much they signed for.  Picks after the 10th round can get up to a $100K bonus without that counting against the bonus pool.  While it may not be known how much any of them signed for, that is likely the most it will end up being.

Round 1, 2nd overall: Kris Bryant, 3B, University of San Diego

Round 2, 41 overall: Rob Zastryzny, LHP, Missouri – Signed 6/17/2013, $1.1M

Round 3, 75 Overall: Jacob Hannemann, CF, BYU – Signed 6/19/2013, $1M

Round 4, 108 Overall: Tyler Skulina, RHP, Kent State – Signed, 6/16/2013, $800K

Round 5, 138 Overall: Trey Masek, RHP, Texas Tech – Signed 6/18/2013, $357K

Round 6, 168 Overall: Scott Frazier, RHP, Pepperdine – Signed 6/19/2013

Round 7, 198 Overall: David Garner, RHP, Michigan State – Signed 6/19/2013, $175K

Round 8, 228 Overall: Sam Wilson, LHP, Lamar Community College – Signed 6/19/2013, $130K

Round 9, 258 Overall: Charcer Burks, CF, William B Travis HS, TX – Signed 6/12/2013, $170K

Round 10, 288 Overall: Zachary Godley, RHP, Tennessee – Signed 6/18/2013, $35K

Round 11, 318 Overall: Jordan Hankins, C, Austin Peay – Signed 6/14/2013

Round 12, 348 Overall: Trevor Clifton, RHP, Heritage HS, TN – Signed 6/8/2013, Unknown terms.  Said he got what he wanted, which was “third round money”

Round 13, 378 Overall: Trevor Graham, RHP, Franklin Pierce University – Signed 6/21/2013

Round 14, 408 Overall: Daniel Poncedeleon, RHP, Houston, TX

Round 15, 438 Overall: Michael Wagner, RHP, University of San Diego – Signed 6/13/2013

Round 16, 468 Overall: Cael Brockmeyer, C, Cal State Bakersfield – Signed 6/18/2013

Round 17, 498 Overall: Kelvin Freeman, 1B, North Carolina A&T State – Signed 6/21/2013

Round 18, 528 Overall: Giuseppe Papaccio, SS, Seton Hall – Signed 6/18/2013

Round 19, 558 Overall: Will Remillard, C, Coastal Carolina

Round 20, 588 Overall: Zak Blair, 2B, Mercyhurst College – Signed 6/11/2013

Round 21, 618 Overall: Joshua McCauley, RHP, Shepherd College – Signed

Round 22, 648 Overall: Kevin Brown, LF, Bryant University – Signed 6/11/2013

Round 23, 678 Overall: Tyler Ihrig, LHP, Marin Community College -Signed 6/12/2013

Round 24, 708 Overall: Tyler Alamo, C, Cypress HS, CA – Signed 7/7/2013

Round 25, 738 Overall: Marcus Doi, OF, Mid-Pacific Institute

Round 26, 768 Overall: Carlos Pena, C, Southwest Miami HS, FL

Round 27, 798 Overall: Tyler Sciacca, CF, Villanova – Signed 6/11/2013

Round 28, 828 Overall: Brad Renner, RHP, Florida State College – Signed

Round 29, 858 Overall: John Garcia, CF, Denbigh HS, VA

Round 30, 888 Overall: Zak Hermans, RHP, Princeton, NJ – Signed 6/9/2013

Round 31, 918 Overall: Sean Johnson, RHP, Western Iowa CC

Round 32, 948 Overall: Keaton Leach, RHP, Glendale College, CA

Round 33, 978 Overall: Chris Madera, CF, Northwest Florida State College

Round 34, 1008 Overall: Jake Thompson, RHP, Siuslaw HS, OR

Round 35, 1038 Overall: Ramsey Romano, SS, Valhalla HS, CA

Round 36, 1068 Overall: Derek Campbell, SS, California

Round 37, 1098 Overall: Jeremy Martinez, C, Mater Dei HS, CA

Round 38, 1128 Overall: Zack Brown, RHP, Seymour HS, IN

Round 39, 1158 Overall: Josh Greene, CF, Forest HS, FL

Round 40, 1188 Overall: Patrick Riley, LF, Delgado College, LA

Cubs First Year Player Draft Recap

The recap comes a day late, as I was at Wrigley yesterday, and driving from Madison for a day game requires an early departure…

(* NOTE ON SCOUTING REPORTS- I am not a scout.  My reports are collaborations of Baseball America, ESPN’s Keith Law, and MLB.com scouting reports.  Typically, I take information common to at least 2/3 of the reports.  My thinking is, if more than one scout is seeing something, there is more likelihood that it’s a solid piece of information.)

As I noted on Thursday night, the Cubs selected big time power hitting 3B/ OF Kris Bryant with the second overall pick.  This was a mild surprise because the Cubs were tied to one of the two big name pitchers, Mark Appel from Stanford and Jonathan Gray from Oklahoma.  It isn’t a big surprise that the Cubs are going to start with Bryant at 3B, according to Jason McLeod, who leads the player development staff.  I suspect, though, his size is going to push him into one of the outfield corners, where he projects to be an average or above fielder  (At this point, I will allow you to drool over an outfield of Kris Bryant, Albert Almora, and Jorge Soler…).  He was drafted for his bat, though.  His 31 HRs outpaced roughly 3/4 of division one college teams.  Bryant, himself, says he could step in and play in the majors now.  The earliest I would expect him to suit up in the big league uniform is as a potential September call up in 2014.  Assuming he gets signed and he shows some advanced skills, it wouldn’t be too much of a stretch to see him start at AA Tennessee, as early as this season.

Cubs 2nd Round Pick Rob Zastryzny Photo: Mizzou Athletics

Cubs 2nd Round Pick Rob Zastryzny
Photo: Mizzou Athletics

Second Round pick, LHP Rob Zastryzny has been tagged by everyone outside of the Cubs organization as a “finesse” pitcher.  That’s not a totally unfair assessment of him, with a fastball that ranges from mid-80s to mid-90s, but being able to crank it up to the mid-90s shows some good ability to change speeds.  Overall, he has a three pitch array of Fastball-Change Up- Slider, which he commands fairly well, and all have the chance to be roughly league average.  The consensus is that he has a ceiling of a middle of the rotation starter, but his higher floor makes him a safe second round pick.

As the draft progressed, the Cubs continued to select college pitching prospects.  The 4th-8th round picks were all pitchers out of college or community college, which was entirely expected heading into the draft.  The 3rd round pick, CF Jacob Hannemann was fascinating because of his inexperience at the collegiate level, but the token comparison to Jacoby Ellsbury has made a lot of fans excited about him.  While he is behind the progression curve for his age because he went on his Mormon mission after high school (should be around AA), his upside makes him a strong pick at that point in the draft.  The pitching selections seemed to echo the comments by Jed Hoyer before the draft, that the best relief pitchers are failed starters.  It would stand to reason, assuming they sign, that Tyler Skulina, Trey Masek, Scott Frazier, David Garner, and Sam Wilson will all get the opportunity to start in the minor leagues, and moved to the ‘pen if required.

Overall, I disagree with the notion that this draft was a signal that the rebuild is being pushed back, as was a popular comment shortly after Bryant was selected.  It seems to me that the Cubs took the player they thought would have had the most impact.  While it may have stunted the growth of the organizations young pitching by not having one of the big arms from this draft in the system, it does not set back the rebuild.  The system is packed pretty tightly with some solid prospects in both the infield and outfield, so there is some chance that turns itself into young pitching…not to mention the existence of this year’s trade deadline.  Also, Steve Stone said on CSN Chicago’s Sportsnet Central that the selection of Bryant means that Starlin Castro is going to get traded.  That’s absurd.  Tying the selection of Bryant and a potential trade of Castro is like saying that tripping on a curb is going to cause food poisoning.  No wonder the Cubs and ESPN canned Stone.