Too Early To Quit On Vitters and Jackson

Two years, in sports, is an eternity.  In the last two years, the Cubs went from being among the bottom of the farm system rankings to among the top, if not the very top.  Over the last two summers, we have swooned over the bat speed of Javier Baez, gushed at Albert Almora’s defensive ability in center, looked wide eyed at Kris Bryant’s power, and Soler-gasmed at one of the biggest signings of the Epstein/ Hoyer era.  Two of the cornerstone prospects, two years ago, were Brett Jackson and Josh Vitters.  Now, in some circles, those guys are busts.

In every respect, it is completely unfair to call either Jackson or Vitters a bust.  Neither has had an extended look at the major league level.  And both have performed in the minor leagues.  The “bust” conversations are had among those who have expected to see them in the majors at this point.  It doesn’t help that the only thing we heard about either of them was Brett Jackson being demoted to AA Tennessee while he continued to try to control the strike out problems that have plagued him.  We didn’t actually hear anything at all about Josh Vitters.  Mostly because it’s pretty hard to talk about a guy who didn’t play a whole lot because of persistent injury issues in 2013.

Josh Vitters is making is overdue transition to being a full time outfielder, which can help mitigate his defensive struggles.  After only 100 plate appearances at Iowa last season, and 88 at-bats, Vitters needs to bounce back from a shortened and injury plagued 2013.  Thing of it is, when he played, he was fine.  his .295/.380/.511 triple slash line in an age 23 season in AAA isn’t anything to gloss over, even if it wasn’t very much.  The kid can hit.  He’s performed every step of the way in the minors, albeit with an adjustment period after arriving.  A broader view of his numbers shows us that in 552 plate appearances in AAA have him at .302/.361/.513.  The biggest knock on Vitters is that he was selected so long ago that people forget that he will not turn 25 until the end of August next season.  If he can get and stay healthy and come to spring training ready, Vitters has to have as realistic a shot as anyone at making the roster, for two reasons.  First, the Cubs are not going to be competitive next season and it would make sense to get a look at him.  And second, because on a team full of fourth and fifth outfielders, there are not clear runaways for roster spots, outside of Junior Lake, Nate Schierholtz, and Ryan Sweeney.  Even if he doesn’t make the Opening Day 25 man roster, it would be a surprise not to see him get an extended look in the majors next season, if for no other reason than to see what he can do there.  His 2012 call-up was the very definition of a small sample size.  109 plate appearances were unspectacular (.121/.193/.202), but it’s ridiculous to give up on a kid who was 22 and playing in mop up duty in a lost season.

Brett Jackson is just over a year older than Vitters, but is similarly forgotten.  He will be turning 26 in early August.  Also, like Vitters, his 2013 was hampered by injuries.  Starting in Spring Training with shoulder inflammation and then having toe and calf problems as the season wore on, Jackson never really got it going.  He was limited to 367 plate appearances between Arizona, Tennessee, and Iowa, and his strike out problems persisted through a reworked swing after spending last winter with former manager, Dale Sveum.  When Jackson has made contact, he’s been fine, with BABIPs generally hanging between .350 and .400 through his full minor league seasons.  It’s the hole in his swing that drives down his average.   One thing Jackson does have going for him is his walk rate, which has been at or above 10% for most of his career, including his brief stint in the majors in 2012.  Between his speed and power, he too has ability that can’t be simply discarded because of an arbitrary timeline for success.  Also, like Vitters, it would be a surprise if he didn’t see some time at the major league level this season, assuming he stays healthy.

Vitters and Jackson are both obviously talented.  They would not have been selected in the first round of their respective drafts if that were not true.  Both would have likely seen time in Chicago last season if it weren’t for injuries.  This season is important for both, to stay healthy and to take the next step.  With Almora, Soler, and potentially Kris Bryant coming behind them in the outfield, their opportunities may be limited by the surge of the newer prospects.  Still, it is far too early to write off either one.  We still don’t know what they are or what they can be, whether that be solid regulars or AAAA players like Bryan LaHair.  And as evidenced by both of these players, the value (real or perceived) of a prospect can change quickly, so it is still in the best interest of the organization to try to get everything they can from these two assets.

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