Tagged: Yu Darvish

Why We Need To Pump the Brakes On Tanaka

With the Christmas Day news that Masahiro Tanaka will indeed be posted by his team in Japan, the Rakuten Golden Eagles, we’ve all started fawning (more than before we knew for sure he was coming) over a guy who could become one of the pieces the Cubs can use to get to the next level in the rebuild.  In fact, Theo Epstein was talking about just this kind of player when he said that he wishes there was free agency for 25 year olds.  There is something we should all consider when we start talking about Tanaka, though, and it is that he is going to cost a lot of money.  And he’s Japanese.

Being Japanese matters.  In Japan, running up high pitch counts is a badge of honor.  Unlike in the United States, where arms are nurtured and cared for, they are worn out and used up until exhaustion over there.  And unlike the US, where athletes merely hide injuries, but eventually relent and tell someone they have an injury, pitchers in Japan work until it is no longer physically possible.  All of those things matter.  His potential for being injured is higher because his arm wasn’t cared for like that of a college pitcher in the US.  That’s not to say he will get hurt, but it happens to pitchers more so than it does to just about any other athlete imaginable.  His previous environment only heightens that risk.  It’s the  extent of the heightening risk that is unknown.

None of this is to say that he will bust.  There is no way to know for sure that Tanaka will get hurt, and even with advanced imaging and scans on his elbow, there’s no way to know for sure that he will get hurt or won’t get hurt.  I am quite positive that he will be X-Ray’d, MRI’d, CT’d, poked, prodded, and tickled like an Elmo doll before any team actually signs him between now and the end of January.

Injury risk has to be part of the equation.  Theo was burned with the Daisuke Matsuzaka signing when he was with Boston, though.  I am sure he remembers.  And I am sure there will be a calculated gamble when it comes to signing Tanaka, whoever lands him.  His age helps.  Being young means his soft tissue is a little more elastic than it would be if he were in his late 20s or early 30s, as most of the other Japanese pitchers were when they came to the US.

EDIT: To clarify, I used fatigue interchangeably with overexertion, which I should not have.  Having an exertion that is normal with a normal recovery period can make muscle stronger while relieving stress on tendons and ligaments.  That is consistent with the way every team “stretches out” their starting pitchers during Spring Training.  Overexertion is working until the point of physical exhaustion.  Remarkable weakness to the point of significantly reduced velocity is an overexertion, and doing it as repeatedly as Tanaka has can (but  not necessarily will) increase the risk of injury.  There is no guarantee that he will get hurt, but since he has been exerting himself at this level for so long, and is just now reaching his physical “prime,” there is some  risk to signing him.  Whether that risk is the same as signing a pitcher who is older, like a Matt Garza or Ubaldo Jimenez or if it is similar to signing Mark Prior just before he was injured can’t be known.  The key confounding variable to all of this is: Everyone is different.

What is unsaid about Tanaka is that he does pose an injury risk that is likely greater than an American pitcher at 25 because of the strain that Japanese baseball puts on its pitchers.  The recency bias tells us that Yu Darvish looks sensational and like he was worth every penny the Rangers paid for him.  That bias excludes the fact that there have been a lot of Japanese pitchers who have come to the United States as highly touted players who have just flamed out because of injuries or because the competition here is greater than it is over there.

Jeff Sullivan wrote about Tanaka at Fangraphs, in which he said that Tanaka is the market’s best starter, which is true, and that international free agents “represent limitless possibilities, and people naturally shift their attention toward the positive extreme.”  That is also true.  Sullivan dives deeper into the scouting report of Tanaka, which is tremendous, and his numbers back the limitless talent. But like any player, especially pitcher, Tanaka has an injury risk that cannot be ignored.  It will not be by the front office, and it shouldn’t be by fans.  After all, we’ve seen this movie before, haven’t we?

Right, Kerry Wood and Mark Prior?

Advertisements