Tagged: Mark Buehrle

Cubs Will Have Competition When Selling Off Pieces

With the news that the Cubs are now “Open For Business,” it is apparent that the “cold assessment” of where the Cubs are is complete, and the plug is being pulled.  In reality, it isn’t any big secret that the Cubs were going to sell off pieces this summer, as the rebuild continues.

The timing couldn’t be better.  While other teams are deciding whether or not to get into the market and start moving anything that isn’t bolted down, the Cubs should start making moves now.  The reason is simple: they have a lot of pieces that can be had from other teams if and when they get into the fray.

Starting pitching is going to be heavily available this summer.  The Phillies have denied that Cliff Lee is going to be available, but that is far from definite.  The Phillies could cure a lot of ailments with that arm, and if they decide to move players, Lee is the biggest and best chip they have to push into the center of the table.  His presence would put a major damper on the market for Matt Garza.  If a team like the Giants or the Rangers is looking for an arm to push them back into the Fall Classic, Lee is going to be sought before Garza.  He comes with more control and he’s a better pitcher.  His price will be bigger, but his reward will match.

Trading Garza will also be met by the resistance of the potential for the Brewers to put Yovani Gallardo and Kyle Lohse on the market, the Blue Jays to seek to move Mark Buehrle and Josh Johnson, or the White Sox trying to trade Jake Peavy.  All would be nice acquisitions that could be thrown into the middle of someone’s rotation for a run to October.  At this early stage, it would appear to be a buyers’ market for mid-rotation starting pitching as the deadline draws closer.

The same can be said about a player like Scott Feldman, who can start at the back of a rotation until the playoffs and become a contributor out of the bullpen in October.  The Twins can move Kevin Correia, the Marlins will likely move Ricky Nolasco, and the Astros are going to try to unload Bud Norris, so the market for a piece to add to the back of a rotation could also get to be a little crowded.

Yet another problem the Cubs face is the marked improvement of their farm system.  The Cubs are not in a position where they have to take on as much talent as they can get because the system is so depleted that it needs as many good bodies as it can take on.  The major area of weakness for the Cubs is in the pitching department.  The front office acknowledged that the pitching is going to come from international signings and from the trade deadline.  The problem with that strategy is simple: the teams who are going to look at adding pieces aren’t rich in pitching prospects.  The Giants and Rangers don’t have a lot of pitching depth in their systems.  Kyle Crick and Clayton Blackburn are the Giants’ top two prospects, and both are in the bottom quarter of Keith Law’s top 100 prospects this season.

What has been said repeatedly still holds true.  If the Cubs can find a team who needs multiple pieces that the Cubs can provide, they have their best opportunity to maximize their return.  What has not been said, though, is that the Cubs face a lot of competition for the players they have to offer, especially the pitching.  It would be doubtful to see the extensive sell-off this season for that reason.  There will be more teams offering similar pieces, and the other teams offering their veteran players need a lot more for their depleted farm systems, which make it much easier to make a deal.

 

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